When my big bindi and saree got me those ‘surprised’ stares

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This was the first time I could sense that, this beautiful drape of ours, that can actually accentuate the Indian female figure like no other garment can, is slowly dying away.

It is not many times that you see me in a saree pic, at least not here on the site when I am sharing the various stories and articles.

My author image has me in a typical western outfit, while most of my weight loss stories show me in shorts and tees, obviously to show the effect of the weight loss and share the results with you.

However, the truth is that I am an absolute saree junkie. I have been collecting sarees ever since I was in high school, and I have some of the best textiles and handloom collection in my stash, and of course, to add to the stash, the many family heirlooms that are passed on from my grandma (nani) and ma.

When my big bindi and saree got me those ‘surprised’ stares

So yesterday being Diwali, I obviously wanted to take the excuse and wear a saree. I chose a plain cotton saree, very unlike the traditional Diwali look mostly prevalent in India I guess, but which is my style and I simply love.

I teamed it up with a big red bindi

I teamed it up with a big red bindi, again my style (and I love the very big black or red bindis and not the fancy ones), and wore my hair in a plain choti. That’s it, no earrings or neck piece as I have sensitive skin and often end up itching.

The Diwali celebrations being over, I had to meet a friend at the airport who was leaving town, and I decided to head out directly from home. The first question came from home itself – “You are going to the airport in a saree?”

Yes.

I smiled and left.

As I reached and got out of the cab, I headed for the popular café where I was to meet the friend. As I was nearing the place, I could feel the crowd slowly turning to look at me.

It was a mix – young guys in groups, families, couples, joint families, friends, a lot of people were there, many of them with a drink in hand, smoking, and turning to look. I could see I was the only one in a saree, apart from one other lady who was way older than me.

It was amusing actually. I did feel a little conscious initially, wondering if I was looking weird or bad, but then my confidence took over again as I strode comfortably in my saree and heels, and I was a smiling happy woman yet again.

My friend put all my doubts to rest, saying I was looking good and complimenting me on the saree and getup. For the entire time I was there, any new person entering the café did give me a look, and sometimes a second look too.

In the end, as I was leaving, I went to the washroom, and yes, every passenger and support staff there also looked at me as if no one wears a saree to the airport, at least no one my age.

I have to admit I also check out women in sarees, if I notice a handloom or textile print, more so to take a look at the saree and how they have dressed it up.

And yes, this was the first time I could sense that, this beautiful drape of ours, that can actually accentuate the Indian female figure like no other garment can, is slowly dying away.

It’s time for me to start wearing my precious drapes again. And what about you? Do you love wearing sarees ever, even if it is just a few days a year? Or do you feel it is something we can give up now?

Read "THIS is why I felt guilty when I started judging her."

Written by

debolina