Kate Hudson thinks being a great parent is her biggest strength

Kate Hudson thinks being a great parent is her biggest strength

As parents, it’s easy to feel inadequate at times. But we shouldn’t. Parents can take their cue from Kate Hudson who did just that on The Today Show recently.

As parents, it’s easy to feel inadequate at times. But we shouldn’t. Parents can take their cue from Kate Hudson who did just that on The Today Show recently.

The Oscar winning actress was there to promote her latest movie Kung Fu Panda 3, where she plays a dancing Panda named Mei-mei, known for celebrating people’s strengths.

When asked what she does best, she said without hesitation that she’s a good parent:

“The best thing I probably do is — I’ll say I’m a pretty darn good parent. I’m going to pat myself on the back for that. I got good kids. My son Ryder’s turning out to be — I’m really super proud of him. And I had something to do with that, so I think parenting is where I feel probably my strongest.”

Being a mom to two boys, aged four and 12, Kate really does her best to be the best mom she can be. It doesn’t mean she doesn’t fall short, though.

In an earlier interview with Allure she opened up about co-parenting with her husband’s youngest father, Matt Bellamy. The main goal is to build a happy environment for their kids to grow up in and to “create something for the kids where they feel like they’re gaining something rather than losing something.”

photo: Mirror UK

photo: Mirror UK

Though the two split up in 2014, they’ve made sure to maintain communication for their son.

“Relationships ending are painful, and you can choose to carry that or you can choose to reframe it. If Matt and I had a great relationship, we would still be together, but we chose to move on because we had different visions of how we wanted to live our lives,” she told Allure. “That doesn’t mean, though, that we can’t rebuild something that would be the best thing for the kids.”

It’s been working for them over the past two years. “It’s been a seamless transition,” she revealed. “Kids just want to see their parents be cool. Everybody’s cool; everybody’s good.”

Past experience has taught her the importance of valuing ties despite the end of romantic relationships: “Being someone who has come from a broken family and has a stepfather,” she says, “I really benefited from having that very consistent presence in my life. And it’s something I am mindful of and want in my life.”

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Written by

Bianchi Mendoza

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