Almost 77 percent Indian parents expect to live with sons in old age

Almost 77 percent Indian parents expect to live with sons in old age

The percent that Indian parents can live with daughters has improved over the last seven years, going from 14 percent to a mere 16 percent

Delhi-based elderly couple, Abhilasha*, 68, and husband Kamal Yaduveer*, 72, have been living with their daughter for the past five years.

Although they have a son, they were taken in by their daughter Kamakshi Ravish*, 38, after Abhilasha suffered from a heart attack in 2010. “My brother stays in the UK so it was difficult for him to take them. But now I don’t intend on sending them anywhere. This is there home and they like it here,” she says while speaking to the Indusparent.

The Yaduveer’s are among a staggering 7 percent Indians, who want to stay with their daughters in their old age.

This percentage has been accessed according to the India Human Development Survey (IHDS), which was conducted jointly by researchers from University of Maryland and National Council of Applied Economic Research, New Delhi.

What the survey says

The findings are a result of a data survey conducted by the IHDS between 2011 and 2012. The data covered a sample of 41,554 households. This was across 33 states and union territories (UTs) in both urban and rural areas.

Here are some prominent points of the survey:

  • In Haryana, 90 percent of respondents said they preferred to live with their sons in old age rather than their daughters. This, coming from a state with India’s lowest child sex ratio (834 females per 1,000 males).
  • Maharashtra closes in on the second position. About 85 percent of parents said that they expected support from sons and not daughters.
Sons Vs Daughters in India

The survey, however, found that a large percentage of Indians wanted at least one daughter.

  • About 73 percent of those surveyed expressed their desire to ideally have one daughter
  • Almost 11 percent of participants said they should ideally have two daughters
  • As many many as 60 percent of those surveyed said they ideally wanted one son
Source: India Human Development Survey

Source: India Human Development Survey

  • And, 26 percent said they wanted two sons
  • Only 6 percent Indians want daughters as a extra child

Continue reading to know this shocking reason that makes Indian parents prefer sons over daughter for their old-age.

Preference of son for old age

The study found that the main reason Indian parents preferred a son over a daughter is that they can depend on them in their old-age.

  • About 77 percent of the respondents said they expect to live with their sons when they are old
  • Only 16 percent Indians said they would consider living with their daughters
  • About 72 percent parents in (highest percentage of parents) prefer to live with daughters in their old age
  • About 17 percent parents in Tamil Nadu preferred go stay with daughters
Source: India Human Development Survey

Source: India Human Development Survey

One of the major reasons for parents to avoid living with daughters is the perception that they can’t ask them for money.

Source: India Human Development Survey

Source: India Human Development Survey

As per the survey, 74 percent of Indians expect sons to support them financially during their old age.

Source: India Human Development Survey

Source: India Human Development Survey

Only 18 percent respondents said they might consider taking money from daughters in old age. 

Although, the percent that Indian parents can live with daughters has improved over the last seven years (14 percent said yes during a in 2004-’05; 16 percent said yes in 2011-’12).

Still, the survey gives a clear picture of the cultural stigma still attached with having and living with a daughter.

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(*name changed | News source: Indiaspend | Image courtesy: Hamaraphotos)

Written by

Deepshikha Punj